Unplug Challenge

Drink wine.

  • http://www.facebook.com/CWFredrickson Christian Fredrickson

    I saw the “drink wine” and “eat bread” lines and reflexively thought about acceptable alternates (my wife’s gluten-free and can’t drink). I mean, these aren’t laws, this isn’t a concatenate formula. What are the repercussions if I rewrite them to suit my needs? I understood the spirit of the document and felt confident I could adjust it. All the same, I was curious to see what the comments on this might be.

    I deeply regret that curiosity. All that’s here is a lot of sticks up a lot of asses.

  • Pat Broeschen

    “Take counsel in wine, resolve in water.” No, that’s not scripture, but not bad advice, either. When I used to smoke weed, the most special times were when I did it in a reflective, expectant, ruminative mood. Unfortunately, over time, memory loss and paranoia began to interfere with the spiritual benefits of becoming reflective, expectant, and ruminative.

    When I saw “drink wine,” my immediate thought was not the action itself, but the connection of wine in scripture with the Vine, the branches, and the fruit: a rich metaphor for my purpose in God’s plan, and my connection to Jesus. We get hung up on behaviors because we have taught or experiential connotations which conflict with another’s intent.

    In many parts of the world, wine has a deep connection to the culture, from the fields upon which farmers wait for God to send rain, to the table, where families gather to break bread, celebrate life, and enjoy the fruit of their labors.

    I am a recovering drug addict and alcoholic, and I long for the wine of heaven. I believe that there will be a table, and that an exciting wine will be served which elevates the mood, enlightens the mind, enlivens fellowship, and does not leave a hangover. For every distortion and counterfeit of the Enemy, God had an original plan. I’m looking forward to drinking that wine with a clean palate and the complete absence of shame or guilt. Cheers, everyone!

  • Mitch Gries

    Wine is an incredible drink for us earthlings. I have two
    wine racks in my home that are my pride and pseudo fireplace

  • Naum

    Is
    sharing wine by use of the common
    cup on Sabbath could transmits germ or disease, especially when children
    involved?

  • Paul

    As one with multiple years of recovery form alcoholism, I think it’s perfectly fine to say “Drink Wine.” Sometimes those of usi recovery expect that the rest of the world need to adjust everything they do to or say to accommodate our feelings or fears. They don’t though. The purpose of recovery is to learn how to live in the world, where alcohol and other substances abound, without resorting any longer to using them and respecting the fact that others don’t have our disease. So if the suggestion is to “Drink wine,” and we know we can’t do that, then perhaps we could simply substitute our favorite beverage name (juice, tea, coffee, even water) in its place much as we do if we have issues with the word “god” and use different words to describe that. Really, folks, it’s time for those of us in recovery to get off the high horse we ride so often.

  • baruchsienna

    I appreciate the desire to retain the Jewish tradition of candles, wine, challah with the wish to make the template modern, accessible and universal. Wine was a very special beverage in the ancient world, but as many commentators have noted, it’s inclusion is problematic. Perhaps reword that line to: drink a special beverage/ have a special drink.

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